The Prayer that Never Fails

Do you know the prayer that never fails?  Paul knew it.  David knew it.  Jesus knew it.  It is a prayer that God always answers.

Today’s Reading

Psalms 28-30; Acts 21:1-14

Selected Verses

The Lord sits enthroned over the flood;
the Lord sits enthroned as king forever.
May the Lord give strength to his people!
May the Lord bless his people with peace!  Psalm 29:10-11

When we heard this, we and the people there urged him not to go up to Jerusalem. Then Paul answered, “What are you doing, weeping and breaking my heart? For I am ready not only to be imprisoned but even to die in Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus.” And since he would not be persuaded, we ceased and said, “Let the will of the Lord be done.”  Acts 21:12-14

Reflections

The prayer that never fails, according to the fictional Father Tim of novelist Jan Karon’s Mitford series, is “Thy will be done.” This phrase was part of the prayer Jesus taught His disciples–the same words He prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane before His crucifixion. Here in Acts, Paul’s friends prayed it also.  [See Matthew 6:10; 26:39-42].

In Tyre, concerned believers understood that Paul would suffer if he went to Jerusalem.  Luke tells us that “Through the Spirit they were telling Paul not to go on to Jerusalem” (vs. 4). Agabus, a prophet, foretold Paul’s imprisonment in Jerusalem. Others in Phoenicia urged him not to go. It was hard for Paul to hear this, and it hurt him because it was going to hurt them. Nevertheless, he was determined to go to Jerusalem though it cost him his life. He had settled that matter. He believed it was what God wanted him to do. They resigned themselves with the words, “Let the will of the Lord be done.”

But the Lord whose will they sought is One who presides over the chaos and turmoil of human life on planet Earth (not to mention the entire universe). As the Psalmist says, He sits enthroned over the flood. His reign never ends. His will is always done. He is the One who gives strength to His people so they may endure the trials He sends. He grants peace so that even in the face of sure suffering His servants know quietness as they pray the prayer that never fails.

Think about it

Must you see bright skies every day in order to have peace? Do you frantically seek to avoid any discomforting situations, much less, life-threatening ones? Make it your aim to be content as long as His will is done.

God’s Delight in Your Prayer

God’s children have special access to Him in prayer.  But do you know that He delights in those who are His and who come to Him with their requests?

Today’s Reading

Psalms 17-18; Acts 19:1-20

Selected Verses

They confronted me in the day of my calamity,
but the Lord was my support.
He brought me out into a broad place;
he rescued me, because he delighted in me.  Psalm 18:18-19

And fear fell upon them all, and the name of the Lord Jesus was extolled.  Acts 19:17

Reflections

The Psalms are filled with exclamations of praise to God for His power and goodness to His needy people. Psalm 18 lists many ways in which the Lord delivered David. Appropriate praise is offered, but then we see this curious line, “he rescued me, because he delighted in me.” David grasped something about God that is often overlooked. God is not annoyed with us when we come to Him seeking help, strength, wisdom, deliverance, etc. God is not merely putting up with us. David understood that the Lord delighted in him.  The Almighty is not bothered that one of His children should come incessantly asking for things. God delivered David because He “delighted” in him.

By contrast, there are several incidents in the book of Acts in which unscrupulous opponents of the gospel attempt to obtain the Holy Spirit for money or to invoke the name of Jesus for personal gain. In Ephesus, the seven sons of Sceva attempt to cast out a demon in Jesus’ name.  They fail as the demon overcomes and possesses them. The incident brought a wave of fear to the population. They realized that they may not trifle with the name of Jesus. God does not delight to hear the prayers of those who are not His.

Think about it

You know that God is all-powerful, omnipotent, and sovereign. He controls all things. You probably believe He can do whatever He wishes to do. You don’t doubt that there is no problem too big for Him. Like the people of Ephesus, you grasp the sanctity and power of the name of Jesus. But do you believe that He delights to hear your prayer and rescue you? How confident are you in His loving kindness, His tender care, His infinite love, and His pleasure in responding to your requests? Think about God delighting in you the next time you ask Him for something you desperately need.

 

Praying to a Big God for Big Things

How a person prays reflects much about his or her faith in and knowledge of God. Today we get a look at the prayer lives of three great men of God.

Today’s Reading

Nehemiah 12-13; Acts 4:23-37

Selected Verses

Remember this also in my favor, O my God, and spare me according to the greatness of your steadfast love. Nehemiah 13:22

When they were released, they went to their friends and reported what the chief priests and the elders had said to them.  And when they heard it, they lifted their voices together to God and said, “Sovereign Lord, who made the heaven and the earth and the sea and everything in them.”  Acts 4:23-24

Reflections

A notable feature of the book of Nehemiah is his prayer life.  On a number of occasions, he asks God to “remember him” (Nehemiah 5:19; 13:14, 22, 31).  It appears that Nehemiah is comfortable turning to God in the midst of his writing.  He shows recognition of God’s holiness and his own need for forgiveness despite his many works of obedience.  At times, it seems like he is offering his works as a basis for his acceptance before God, but we should probably not judge him too severely if he did not grasp as fully as we can the grace of God through the atonement for sin made by the Lord Jesus Christ.  Certainly, in the verse quoted above, he shows an awareness of and dependence on the love of God.

In Acts, Peter and John have been released from arrest by the chief priests after being warned not to preach in the name of Christ.  What do they do?  They look for their friends, their fellow believers, they make a report as to what had occurred, and then they begin to pray.  How do they address God?  They address Him as the “Sovereign Lord, who made the heaven and the earth and the sea and everything in them.”  But notice what they do not request.  Do they ask for safety? No!  Nor do they pray for the destruction of their enemies.  They pray for boldness to keep speaking God’s Word.  And God hears their prayer, fills them with His Holy Spirit, and gives them continued boldness.

Think about it

What can you learn from the examples of prayer in the lives of Nehemiah, Peter, and John?  Be sure you remember who God is and what He wants of us.  Pray to a big God. Pray for big things–things that you know He wants.  After all, He is the Sovereign Lord, who made the heaven and the earth and the sea and everything in them, isn’t He?

Prayer in the Face of Injustice

Injustice abounds in this world, but God gives His people prayer so that they may call upon Him rather than to lose heart.

Today’s Reading

II Samuel 1-3; Luke 18:1-17

Selected Verses

And the king said to his servants, “Do you not know that a prince and a great man has fallen this day in Israel? And I was gentle today, though anointed king. These men, the sons of Zeruiah, are more severe than I. The Lord repay the evildoer according to his wickedness!” II Samuel 3:38-39

And will not God give justice to his elect, who cry to him day and night? Will he delay long over them?  I tell you, he will give justice to them speedily. Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?  Luke 18:7-8

Reflections

David gradually gained power to rule all Israel.  He welcomed his repentant former enemy, Abner, but Joab, David’s military commander, soon assassinated him.  David showed mercy; Joab took revenge.  The unity of the kingdom under David was jeopardized by Joab’s action.  David mourned for Abner and the people recognized that Joab had committed an injustice.

Jesus taught His disciples a parable so that they would pray rather than lose heart.  It seems that they were in danger of getting discouraged about the injustice they saw in the world.  They were about to see the greatest injustice ever perpetrated in human history, the arrest, trial, sentencing, and crucifixion of the Son of God.   Jesus told them that even an irreverent, hard-hearted judge would not be able to resist the constant pleading of a widow.

But God is much more gracious to His elect than the judge was to the insistent widow.  He will respond and bring swift justice to those who call on Him.  Jesus was telling them, “Pray.  Don’t lose heart.”

Think about it

Certainly, injustice abounds in human governments and societies.  The powerful impose their wills on the weak.  Shrewd and unprincipled people take advantage of the ignorant and trusting. Of course, it can be disheartening.  Yet Jesus tells His disciples not to lose heart. Instead pray.  He promises that God will give justice to His elect who cry to Him day and night.

Why do we not see more justice from God?  The fault is in our lack of faith evidenced by lack of prayer.  Do we cry to God or merely wring our hands and worry?  Do we cry to Him in faith day and night, or merely send up an occasional perfunctory prayer and go back to whining about all the evils in the world?  Think about that.  Better yet, pray now that He may give justice to His elect.

What to do while longing for the Kingdom

It’s natural and good to be longing for the full arrival of the kingdom of God. But Jesus gave us an assignment while we are waiting.  Do you know what it is?

Today’s reading

Judges 20-21; Luke 11:1-28]

Selected Verses

In those days there was no king in Israel. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes. Judges 21:25

And he said to them, “When you pray, say:  ‘Father, hallowed be your name.  Your kingdom come.'”  Luke 11:2

Reflections

The theme of the book of Judges is “there was no king in Israel [so] everyone did what was right in his own eyes.” Especially the final chapters of the book show selected incidents which illustrate this same theme.   People disregarded the law.  Their worship of God was corrupted.  Their marriages were in disarray.  There was sexual immorality reminiscent of Sodom and Gomorrah.     It is not hard to see that public opinion in Israel would soon favor installing a king.  That would happen soon.  But would a king in Israel solve the problems that existed under the Judges?

Hold that question for a bit and fast forward to the Gospel of Luke where Jesus’ disciples observe His prayer life.  They ask for instruction about prayer.  Jesus gives them the prayer we usually call “The Lord’s Prayer” with its assortment of sample petitions.  After addressing God as Father and praying that His name be held as holy, the Lord gives them this petition, “Your kingdom come.”

Now, back to the earlier question.  The kingdom of Israel would not solve the problems of their society, much less the problems of the world.  But Jesus came announcing the first stages of the arrival of the kingdom of God.  He also gave His disciples the assignment of praying for the kingdom to come in its fullness.

Think about it

We have a responsibility to the secular governments or kingdoms we live in now. However, the only government that will last forever is the kingdom of God ruled by the Prince of Peace and the King of Kings, the Lord Jesus Christ.

Are you longing for that kingdom to fully come?  Isn’t it hard to wait for the eternal reign of our Lord, where peace will be permanent, sin will be unknown, love and justice will be the norm, and there will be no more sickness, sorrow, and death?  We know from Scripture that this is God’s ultimate will.  It is right to be longing for the kingdom, but Jesus told us to pray that it may come soon.  Pray that God’s will would be done on earth as it is in heaven. This is a prayer God is going to answer.

Leadership Lessons from Jesus and Joshua

Leaders are frequently challenged by high stress situations and high maintenance people. God’s Word gives guidance for effective leadership.

Today’s reading

Joshua 16-18; Luke 5:1-16

Selected Verses

So the men arose and went, and Joshua charged those who went to write the description of the land, saying, “Go up and down in the land and write a description and return to me. And I will cast lots for you here before the Lord in Shiloh.”  Joshua 18:8

But now even more the report about him went abroad, and great crowds gathered to hear him and to be healed of their infirmities.  But he would withdraw to desolate places and pray. Luke 5:15-16

Reflections

Both Jesus and Joshua model how effective leaders handle high stress situations and high maintenance people. There are two important guidelines here for effective leaders.

  1. Effective leaders empower people to solve their own problems, as much as possible. Joshua gave the responsibility to the seven landless tribes to survey the territory, to write a description of the remaining land dividing it in seven portions, and to report back to him for allotments. Earlier, Joshua told the tribe of Joseph (Manasseh and Ephraim) to clear their land rather than asking for more territory.
  2. Effective leaders take time for prayer even during high stress times. Jesus’ ministry was becoming more widely known and the crowds came with endless needs for healing and teaching. It was not a bad thing that they saw Jesus as the one who could both heal them and teach them, but there were limits to what one person, even Jesus, could do. Jesus modeled for us the need to take time alone in prayer.

Think about it

In whatever leadership roles you fill, are you following these two guidelines as you face pressure and the expectations of others?  A mother recently told me how much joy she has seeing her young son assume more responsibility for getting himself ready for bed. In our church, we train and empower gifted people to teach Sunday school classes. This process adds quality to our classes and their members.

The biggest danger is the tendency to operate purely on human wisdom and to fail to take time alone for prayer. Evaluate your life today. Make the needed changes so that you handle high stress situations and high maintenance people in wise and godly ways.

How to Know You’ve Learned

Like people in Bible times, we struggle to apply what we think we have learned in the past to current challenges. How can we tell we have learned?

Today’s reading

Exodus 13-15; Matthew 19:1-15

Selected verses

When they came to Marah, they could not drink the water of Marah because it was bitter; therefore it was named Marah.  And the people grumbled against Moses, saying, “What shall we drink?”   Exodus 15:23-24

Then children were brought to him that he might lay his hands on them and pray. The disciples rebuked the people,  but Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of heaven.” Matthew 19:13-14

Reflections

Not much changed in people, even God’s people, from the time of Moses to the time of Jesus Christ. Not much has changed from those times until today.  Don’t we struggle to apply what we think we have learned in the past to current problems and challenges?

The Israelites saw God deliver them from Egypt by a series of plagues. Then Pharaoh’s army jeopardized their exodus and pursued them. They cried to God in desperation, and God delivered them again. They rejoiced as the cadavers of their enemies washed up on the shores of the Red Sea while they watched safely. Could God deliver them from anything, repeat, anything? Yes, yes, a thousand times, YES!

But within hours they were complaining about the lack of water and then, when they found water, they complained that it was bitter. Sure enough. They had forgotten the lesson of the Red Sea.

Jesus taught the disciples that the greatest in the kingdom of heaven is a child (Matthew 18:1-3), but when little children were brought to Jesus those same disciples rebuked the parents who brought them. They forgot the lesson of the little child quickly.

Think about it

God is patient with us, slow learners and thick-headed disciples. We really don’t get it, do we? Let’s face it; we are often repeating the same foolish mistakes of the Israelites and the disciples. How many times do we need to be re-taught the same lessons of faith, patience, and prayer? How quickly we forget what He has done in the past and cave in to doubt, complaining, whining, and panic.

Trust Him to act. Call upon Him with confidence to do more than you can ask or think (Ephesians 3:20-21). Transfer what you learned before to the trials and uncertainties of today. Then you will know that you have really learned.  Oh, and praise God for His patience. He has a bigger plan than we know.

What’s important? I forget.

Today’s reading:

Genesis 18-19; Matthew 6

Selected verses

The sun had risen on the earth when Lot came to Zoar.  Then the Lord rained on Sodom and Gomorrah sulfur and fire from the Lord out of heaven.  And he overthrew those cities, and all the valley, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and what grew on the ground. Genesis 19:23-25

But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. Matthew 6:33

Reflections

What should we be worried about?  To put it another way, what’s really important?

We would be clueless, if God had not revealed His holiness and His will to us through special revelation (the Bible).   A secular, materialistic mindset tells us to live for ourselves (like the people of Sodom and Gomorrah).  “Give no thought to God but only to indulging your own desires.  What judgment?”  they say.

Lot learned the hard way that God can reduce you to nothing in an instant.  What should we be worried about?  Not trying to hang on to this world, our position, our stuff.

Jesus told His disciples not to worry about their lives but to focus on the Kingdom of God and His righteousness.

Think about it

It’s time for a reality check.  What’s important?  It’s supremely important to seek His kingdom and His righteousness.  Food and drink and clothing are necessary.  God knows that, but seeking His kingdom is the priority.  He will see that we do not lack what we need.

And we do not get what we need by phony, prayer chants.  God is not moved by many words and empty phrases.  The prayer Jesus taught was simple, brief, and thoughtful.  Prayer should honor God by following those guidelines.

What is important?

  • A single-minded focus on the eternal, glorious, righteous Kingdom of God.
  • Simple prayer.

Ask God to help you keep this straight today.

Does Prayer Matter?

Are you convinced that your prayer for others is a vital and essential means through which God blesses and helps them?  See how Paul would answer that question in today’s reading.

Today’s reading:  1 Corinthians 15:12-2 Corinthians 1:11

My selection:

You also must help us by prayer, so that many will give thanks on our behalf for the blessing granted us through the prayers of many.  2 Corinthians 1:11

For more reflections on this passage, see the corresponding reading in my book Cover to Cover: Through the Bible in 365 days.

Unless otherwise noted, all Scripture references are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Permanent Text Edition® (2016). Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.

Overwhelmed by God

Have you been overwhelmed by God?

Can you imagine how the Apostle Paul felt as he wrote his letter to the Roman church and pondered the grandeur of the eternal Deity?  Of course, his epistle was more than a mere letter between friends.  The Apostle was given the task of transmitting God’s word.  Even so, as he wrote, he experienced what other true believers also sense as we reflect on the glory of the Holy One.  He was overwhelmed by God. Human pen or tongue cannot adequately describe His majesty, but as we pray and worship Him we are compelled to try.

Today’s reading:

Romans 11:11-15:13

My selection:

Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are his judgments and how inscrutable his ways!

 “For who has known the mind of the Lord,
    or who has been his counselor?”
“Or who has given a gift to him
    that he might be repaid?”

 For from him and through him and to him are all things. To him be glory forever. Amen.

Romans 11:33-36

For more reflections on this passage, see the corresponding reading in my book Cover to Cover: Through the Bible in 365 days.

Unless otherwise noted, all Scripture references are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Permanent Text Edition® (2016). Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.